Don’t BEE Afraid! HoneyFest Saturday, Sept. 10th

This post originally appeared in Contact with Kettering Community Magazine Fall 2016 Research has shown that the bee population has declined significantly since 2008 due to habitat loss, reduced food sources, pesticides, climate change, and bee diseases. But why should the average consumer care about an insect that is commonly feared and thought of as a nuisance? Bees are pollinators--insects that cause plants to make fruit or seeds. They assist plants in reproducing by carrying pollen from flower to flower. Many crops are dependent on pollinators including pumpkins, watermelons, pears, peaches, plums, apples, and blueberries.…

Countryside Park’s New Pollinator Garden

With financial support provided by the Levin Family Foundation, a new pollinator garden has been installed in Countryside Park on the Washington Township Recreation Campus. Included in the design are seventeen varieties of native plants, three butterfly houses, a bench, and stepping stones. The pollinator garden is located along the northwest edge of Countryside Park which runs behind Rec West, the Recreation Center and east of the Rec Center. Pollinator gardens help restore and maintain abundant and healthy populations of butterflies and bees that are essential to pollination. Why are pollinators so crucial for human…

37 Million Bees Found Dead After Planting Large GMO Corn Field Treated with Neonicotinoid Class of Pesticides

37 Million Bees Found Dead After Planting Large GMO Corn Field Treated with Neonicotinoid Class of Pesticides Originally Posted By Green Food Magazine on March 22, 2016 Millions of bees dropped dead after GMO corn was planted few weeks ago in Ontario, Canada. The local bee keeper, Dave Schuit who produces honey in Elmwood lost about 37 million bees which are about 600 hives. “Once the corn started to get planted our bees died by the millions,” Schuit said. While many bee keepers blame neonicotinoids, or “neonics.” for colony collapse of bees and many countries…

Upcoming Community Events

Follow this link to check out these upcoming events in your local Dayton community! Pollinator Workshop at Brukner Nature Center on June 18th Pollinator Honey and Bee Festival at Whole Foods Dayton on June 25th

Getting ready for Spring 2016; New videos and presentations on the way

The spring of 2016 will hold lots of new endeavors for Propolis Projects, including many new projects, community outreach, and lots of opportunities to volunteer and to learn about what is affecting pollinators in the Midwest. Also, we will be making some new additions to this website, so stay posted for more pictures, videos, information, and updates about the activities of Propolis Projects and volunteer opportunities. Here's a taste of what's to come in terms of media here: City of bees Light queen walking around Groomed Mites and Families of Mites

WPAFB Responds to President Obama’s Pollinator Memorandum

To promote the health of honey bees and other pollinators, President Obama issued a presidential memorandum last year in June stating that the Department of Defense shall support habitat restoration projects for pollinators. Watch below to see how Wright-Patterson Air Fore Base, in partnership with PropolisProjects, is supporting the President's memorandum. Dwight Wells, director of the Ohio State Beekeepers Association, is featured in the video above. Last June, Wells served as project coordinator for the placement of four beehives in Huffman Prairie, an 84-acre patch of rough pasture on Wright Patterson Air Force Base northeast of Dayton. The hives contain 40,000 Carniolan…

A New Kind of Honeybee Data Collection

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), leaders in the Global Initiative for Honeybee Health, is addressing the decline in bee populations by attaching RFID tags to the backs of 15,000 honeybees in Australia and Brazil. As the bees enter and exit their hive, electronic readers can record their individual behaviors. Dr. Paulo de Souza of CSIRO stated in a press release that the readers will send data to researchers who can "analyze the effects of stress factors including disease, pesticides, air pollution, water contamination, diet and extreme weather on the movements of bees and…

The Varroa Mite Parasite

The most serious pest of modern beekeeping is Varroa destructor, an Asian mite that jumped from the eastern hive bee Apis cerana to the western bee Apis mellifera when commercial beekeeping brought the two bee species into contact. The mite causes severe winter losses in heavily infected bee yards. Here, a mite rides on the abdomen of a worker bee. Check out more great photos of bees and other insects by Alexander Wild.